Tell Me A Story

by | Feb 14, 2018

Adriel's Used and Out of Print Bookstore

Have you heard? Adriel's family is traveling to Tanzania, Africa to spend time with family. To help aid their finances for this expensive trip, a friend donated hundreds of books for Adriel to sell. This friend has been buying used, discarded, and out of print books for over two decades instead of owning a television. His curiosity is as insatiable as Adriel's, so he reads primarily non-fiction with a good sprinkling of novels thrown in. All books are in good to very good condition with minimal markings. Most hardcovers also have their dust jackets still. Over the course of 2018, Adriel will be posting the books, one box at a time, for sale. You can find this week's selection and the stores they're available on below. If Adriel reads a book from the vast selection, she'll review it and post the review along with the week's books for sale.

This week has some great stories! I hope you enjoy one of these!

000 General Works —
100 Philosophy and Psychology —
200 Religion and Mythology:

The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell: The Power of Myth launched an extraordinary resurgence of interest in Joseph Campbell and his work. A preeminent scholar, writer, and teacher, he has had a profound influence on millions of people–including Star Wars creator George Lucas. To Campbell, mythology was the “song of the universe, the music of the spheres.” With Bill Moyers, one of America’s most prominent journalists, as his thoughtful and engaging interviewer, The Power of Myth touches on subjects from modern marriage to virgin births, from Jesus to John Lennon, offering a brilliant combination of intelligence and wit. This extraordinary book reveals how the themes and symbols of ancient narratives continue to bring meaning to birth, death, love, and war. From stories of the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece and Rome to traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity, a broad array of themes are considered that together identify the universality of human experience across time and culture. An impeccable match of interviewer and subject, a timeless distillation of Campbell’s work, The Power of Myth continues to exert a profound influence on our culture. 

300 Social Sciences —
400 Language —
500 Natural Science —
600 Technology —
700 Arts —
800 Literature:

Winding Stair by Douglas C. Jones: Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 1890, is a haven of justice presiding over thousands of square miles known as the Indian Nation, a land that harbors the most hardened criminals in the country. When a woman is found murdered, young attorney Eben Pay, newly arrived to the territory, is pulled into a posse that follows a trail of blood and destruction. Among the dead he discovers a survivor, the beautiful, traumatized Jennie Thrasher, and the question of what she witnessed hangs like a storm cloud over the investigation. From the trial to the courtroom, Winding Stair is a classic historical novel that brings to vivid life a bygone era.
Long Voyage Back by Luke Rhinehart: WHEN THE BOMBS CAME, ONLY THE LUCKY ESCAPED. IN THE HORROR THAT FOLLOWED, ONLY THE STRONG WOULD SURVIVE. The voyage of the trimaran Vagabond began as a pleasure cruise on the Chesapeake Bay. Then came the War Alert … the unholy glow on the horizon … the terrifying reports of nuclear destruction. In the days that followed, it became clear just how much chaos was still to come. For Captain Neil Loken and his passengers, their shipmates were now the only family they had, the open seas their only sanctuary, their skill and courage all that might get them out alive.
Two Years Before the Mast and Twenty-Four Years After by R.H. Dana, Jr: Two Years Before the Mast is a memoir by the American author Richard Henry Dana, Jr., published in 1840, having been written after a two-year sea voyage starting in 1834. A film adaptation under the same name was released in 1946. While an undergraduate at Harvard College, Dana had an attack of the measles which affected his vision. Thinking it might help his sight, Dana left Harvard to enlist as a common sailor on a voyage around Cape Horn on the brig Pilgrim. He returned to Massachusetts two years later aboard the Alert (which left California sooner than the Pilgrim). He kept a diary throughout the voyage, and, after returning, he wrote a recognized American classic, Two Years Before the Mast, published in 1840.
The Brave by Nicholas Evans: There’s little love in eight-year-old Tom Bedford’s life. His parents are old and remote and the boarding school they’ve sent him to bristles with bullies and sadistic staff. The only comfort he gets is from his fantasy world of Cowboys and Indians. But when his sister Diane, a rising star of stage and screen, falls in love with one of his idols, the suave TV cowboy Ray Montane, Tom’s life is transformed. They move to Hollywood and all his dreams seem to have come true. Soon, however, the sinister side of Tinseltown casts its shadow and a shocking act of violence changes their lives forever. What happened all those years ago remains a secret that corrodes Tom’s life and wrecks his marriage. Only when his estranged son, a US Marine, is charged with murder do the events resurface, forcing him to confront his demons. As he struggles to save his son’s life, he will learn the true meaning of bravery.  Powerfully written and intensely moving, The Brave traces the legacy of violence behind the myth of the American West and explores our quest for love and identity, the fallibility of heroes and the devastating effects of family secrets.
The Magnificent Ambersons by Booth Tarkington: The Magnificent Ambersons is a 1918 novel written by Booth Tarkington which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize for the novel. It was the second novel in his Growth trilogy, which included The Turmoil (1915) and The Midlander (1923, retitled National Avenue in 1927). In 1925 the novel was first adapted for film under the title Pampered Youth. In 1942 Orson Welles wrote and directed an acclaimed film adaptation of the book. Welles’s original screenplay was the basis of a 2002 TV movie produced by the A&E Network.
Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton: First published in 1911, “Ethan Frome” is Edith Wharton’s tale of thwarted dreams and desires set in small New England town at the turn of the 20th century. When a young engineer is on assignment in the fictitious town of Starkfield, Massachusetts, he becomes fascinated by the deformed and troubled local, Ethan Frome. Framed through an extended flashback, the young engineer ultimately learns the tragic history of Ethan Frome when he is forced to take refuge at the man’s house during a winter storm. Frome, who is married to Zenobia, a nagging hypochondriac of a woman, finds himself trapped in an unfulfilling life. Zenobia’s young cousin Mattie Silver comes to live with them in order to help out around the farmhouse and Ethan sees an opportunity for happiness. When his wife begins to notice the growing attachment between Ethan and Mattie she plans to send her away, insisting she needs a more competent servant, which sets in motion a tragic set of circumstances for all involved. “Ethan Frome” remains to this day as one of Wharton’s finest literary accomplishments.
My Antonia by Willa Cather: My Ántonia evokes the Nebraska prairie life of Willa Cather’s childhood, and commemorates the spirit and courage of immigrant pioneers in America. One of Cather’s earliest novels, written in 1918, it is the story of Ántonia Shimerda, who arrives on the Nebraska frontier as part of a family of Bohemian emigrants. Her story is told through the eyes of Jim Burden, a neighbor who will befriend Ántonia, teach her English, and follow the remarkable story of her life.
Working in the fields of waving grass and tall corn that dot the Great Plains, Ántonia forges the durable spirit that will carry her through the challenges she faces when she moves to the city. But only when she returns to the prairie does she recover her strength and regain a sense of purpose in life. In the quiet, probing depth of Willa Cather’s art, Ántonia’s story becomes a mobbing elegy to those whose persistence and strength helped build the American frontier.
The Best of James Herriot: Favourite Memories of a Country Vet by James Herriot SOLD!
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo: Though written at the beginning of the Romantic era, this remarkable French historical romance takes place in medieval Paris at the Cathedral of Notre Dame. It is there that the deformed Quasimodo has gone deaf ringing the grand church’s bells for his adoptive father Dom Claude Frollo. The severe priest, though he looks after the grotesque Quasimodo, ignores the public persecution that the man suffers whenever he leaves the Cathedral, and it is at just such a moment of vulnerability that the lovely young Gypsy Esmeralda shows Quasimodo an act of kindness that leads to his inner transformation. Though still hated by everyone, Quasimodo’s sleeping soul awakens and grows in an extraordinary conversion to the sublime, allowing him to care for and protect Esmeralda even as those who admired her come to fear and despise her. A commanding and epic melodrama fully utilizing the extremes of passion and religion in the bygone Gothic era, Hugo’s novel explores social justice through the suffering of his characters, though with a compassion and melancholy that belies the author’s conviction in the impossibility of salvation in his contemporary world.
The Outsider (L’Etranger) by Albert Camus: The Stranger or The Outsider (L’ Étranger) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1942. Its theme and outlook are often cited as examples of existentialism, though Camus did not consider himself an existentialist; in fact, its content explores various philosophical schools of thought, including (most prominently and specifically) absurdism, as well as determinism, nihilism, naturalism, and stoicism. The title character is Meursault, an Algerian who seemingly irrationally kills an Arab man whom he recognizes in French Algiers. The story is divided into two parts: Meursault’s first-person narrative views before and after the murder, respectively.
Come Winter by Douglas C. Jones: In post-Civil War Arkansas, wealthy Roman Hasford tries to forget an unhappy marriage by entering politics and wielding power.
The Collected Stories of Katherine Anne Porter by Katherine Anne Porter: Porter’s reputation as one of americanca’s most distinguished writers rests chiefly on her superb short stories. This volume includes the collections Flowering Judas; Pale Horse, Pale Rider; and The Leaning Tower as well as four stories not available elsewhere in book form. Winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize.
Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather: Death Comes for the Archbishop is a 1927 novel by Willa Cather. It concerns the attempts of a Catholic bishop and a priest to establish a diocese in New Mexico territory. The novel portrays two well-meaning and devout French priests who will encounter a well-entrenched Spanish-Mexican clergy after the United States acquired New Mexico in the Mexican–American War. As a result of the U.S. victory, the dioceses of the new state were remapped by the Vatican to reflect the new national borders. Several of these entrenched priests are depicted as examples of greed, avarice, and gluttony, while others live simple, abstemious lives among the Native Americans. Cather portrays the Hopi and Navajo sympathetically, and her characters express the near futility of overlaying their religion on a millennia-old native culture.
Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis: Zorba the Greek is a novel written by the Greek author Nikos Kazantzakis, first published in 1946. It is the tale of a young Greek intellectual who ventures to escape his bookish life with the aid of the boisterous and mysterious Alexis Zorba. The novel was adapted into a successful 1964 film of the same name by Michael Cacoyannis as well as a 1968 musical, Zorba. The book opens in a café in Piraeus, just before dawn on a gusty autumn morning. The year is most likely 1916. The narrator, a young Greek intellectual, resolves to set aside his books for a few months after being stung by the parting words of a friend, Stavridakis, who has left for the Russian Caucasus in order to help some Pontic Greeks (in that region often referred to as Caucasus Greeks) who are being persecuted. He sets off for Crete in order to re-open a disused lignite mine and immerse himself in the world of peasants and working-class people. Zorba the Greek has achieved widespread international acclaim and recognition.
Sketches from a Hunter’s Album: The Complete Edition by Ivan Turgenev: SOLD!
The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. by Washington Irving: The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent., commonly referred to as The Sketch Book, is a collection of 34 essays and short stories written by American author Washington Irving. It was published serially throughout 1819 and 1820. The collection includes two of Irving’s best-known stories, attributed to the fictional Dutch historian Diedrich Knickerbocker, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle”. It also marks Irving’s first use of the pseudonym “Geoffrey Crayon”, which he would continue to employ throughout his literary career. The Sketch Book, along with James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, was the first widely read work of American literature in Britain and Europe. It also helped advance the reputation of American writers with an international audience.[citation needed]Apart from “Rip Van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” — the pieces which made both Irving and The Sketch Book famous — other tales include “Roscoe”, “The Broken Heart”, “The Art of Book-making”, “A Royal Poet”, “The Spectre Bridegroom”, “Westminster Abbey”, “Little Britain”, and “John Bull”. Irving’s stories were highly influenced by German folktales; “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” was inspired by a folktale recorded by Karl Musäus. Stories range from the maudlin (such as “The Wife” and “The Widow and Her Son”) to the picaresque (“Little Britain”) and the comical (“The Mutability of Literature”), but the common thread running through The Sketch Book — and a key part of its attraction to readers — is the personality of Irving’s pseudonymous narrator, Geoffrey Crayon. Erudite, charming, and never one to make himself more interesting than his tales, Crayon holds The Sketch Book together through the sheer power of his personality — and Irving would, for the rest of his life, seamlessly enmesh Crayon’s persona with his own public reputation.
Tom Jones by Henry Fielding: Tom Jones is widely regarded as one of the first and most influential English novels. It is certainly the funniest. Tom Jones, the hero of the book, is introduced to the reader as the ward of a liberal Somerset squire. Tom is a generous but slightly wild and feckless country boy with a weakness for young women. Misfortune, followed by many spirited adventures as he travels to London to seek his fortune, teach him a sort of wisdom to go with his essential good-heartedness.
Fathers and Children by IvanTurgenev: Ivan Turgenev’s classic novel (also known as “Fathers and Sons”), featuring Eugene Bazarov, thought to be the “first Bolshevik” in Russian literature. The novel explores the changing times and clash of generations in Russia during the period between Russia’s defeat in the Crimean War and the emancipation of Russian serfs. Featuring the conception of the “new man”, the book explores the traditional values of the older generation contrasted with the perceived nihilism of the younger generation.
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer: One spring day, the Narrator of The Canterbury Tales rents a room at the Tabard Inn before he recommences his journey to Canterbury. That evening, a group of people arrive at the inn, all of whom are also going to Canterbury to receive the blessings of “the holy blissful martyr,” St. Thomas à Becket. Calling themselves “pilgrims” because of their destination, they accept the Narrator into their company. The Narrator describes his newfound traveling companions. The Host at the inn, Harry Bailey, suggests that, to make the trip to Canterbury pass more pleasantly, each member of the party tell two tales on the journey to Canterbury and two more tales on the journey back. The person who tells the best story will be rewarded with a sumptuous dinner paid for by the other members of the party. The Host decides to accompany the pilgrims to Canterbury and serve as the judge of the tales.

900 Geography and History —

Adriel Wiggins

Adriel Wiggins

Continuity Editor & Virtual Assistant

Hello! I’m Adriel Wiggins, wife, mother of three, fur mom, bibliophile, art geek, and all around student. I’ve been on a quest all of my life to learn as much as I possibly can about everything I possibly can. This has helped me tremendously in what eventually became my life’s purpose: to help other people become the best version of themselves. It is in that line that I became an assistant.

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